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Energy Policy

  • According to a briefing note published today by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), renewable energy is the lowest cost, most sustainable solution to Australia’s energy policy crisis and potentially one of the country’s largest export industries of the future.

    Read more: http://econews.com.au/60798/ieefa-why-renewable-energy-is-the-solution-for-australia/
  • This report, prepared jointly by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21), identifies key barriers and highlights policy options to boost renewable energy deployment.

    Read more: https://www.irena.org/publications/2018/Apr/Renewable-energy-policies-in-a-time-of-transition
  • The report presents options to strengthen Pakistan’s policy, regulatory and institutional framework for renewables. It suggests ways to strengthen renewable energy targets, examines the constraints of existing grid infrastructure, highlights the best mechanisms to reduce costs and ease technical challenges, and underlines the potential for private investment in renewables for off-grid and rural electrification.

    Read more: https://www.irena.org/publications/2018/Apr/Renewables-Readiness-Assessment-Pakistan

  • The second annual IEA benchmark analysis of energy investment – the lifeblood of the global energy system – presents diverse findings, with upbeat news in some quarters and bearish indicators in others. World Energy Investment 2017 provides a critical foundation for decision making by governments, the energy industry and financial institutions.

    Read more: http://www.iea.org/bookshop/759-World_Energy_Investment_2017

  • The global energy system is moving closer to a historic transformation. This year's edition of the International Energy Agency (IEA)'s comprehensive publication on energy technology focuses on the opportunities and challenges of scaling and accelerating the deployment of clean energy technologies. This includes looking at more ambitious scenarios than the IEA has produced before. Improvements in technology continue to modify the outlook for the energy sector, driving changes in business models, energy demand and supply patterns as well as regulatory approaches. Energy security, air quality, climate change and economic competitiveness are increasingly being factored in by decision makers. Energy Technology Perspectives 2017 (ETP 2017) details these trends as well as the technological advances that will shape energy security and environmental sustainability for decades to come.

    Read more: http://www.iea.org/bookshop/758-Energy_Technology_Perspectives_2017

  • This review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Mexico and provides recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide the country towards a more secure, sustainable and affordable energy future.

    Read more: https://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/EnergyPoliciesBeyondIEACountriesMexico2017.pdf

  • This review analyses the energy policy challenges facing New Zealand and provides recommendations to help guide the country towards a more secure, sustainable and affordable energy future. The IEA review highlights the areas that are critical to the success of the energy policy agenda in New Zealand. To support sustainable growth in line with the Paris Agreement, the government should facilitate technology opportunities for renewable energy and energy efficiency, in buildings, industrial heat, transport and agriculture. The government has ambitious plans to boost the share of electric vehicles and renewable energy. The country has a flexible power system, but future growth requires fine-tuning of market rules in favour of even more flexibility, demand response, smart and effective electricity retail and distribution. While security of supply is well ensured by effective markets, an energy-constraint system can benefit from market-based risk managements tools, including a safety net for dry years as well as access to global LNG markets.

    Read more: https://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/EnergyPoliciesofIEACountriesNewZealand2017.pdf

  • In this inaugural annual report on energy investments around the world, the International Energy Agency (IEA) looks at the lifeblood of the global energy system: investment. The ability to attract and direct capital flows is vital to transitioning to a low-carbon economy while also maintaining energy security and expanding energy access worldwide. The success or failure of energy policies can be measured by their ability to mobilise investments. This new report measures in a detailed manner the state of investment in the energy system across technologies, sectors and regions. The analysis takes a comprehensive look at the critical issues confronting investors, policy makers and consumers over the past year.

    Read more: https://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/WEI2016.pdf

  • IIEC is a non-governmental (NGO), not-for-profit organization, which was established in 1984, to foster the implementation of energy efficiency in developing countries and countries in transition. As an organization with proven technical capabilities, IIEC designs policies, implements programs, and supports institutions that mainstream energy efficiency in the entire value chain of energy systems and use. IIEC’ s approach focuses on implementation, resulting in policies developed in partnership with key policymakers and industry in its target countries as well as the bilateral and multilateral institutions that help to shape energy policy and investment priorities globally.